Will Your Website Pass The 5 Second Test?

Date: Posted by: Ezine Articles In: EzineArticles, Web


will your website pass the 5 second test?


One of the biggest headaches webmasters face is getting their website visitors to stay on their website and ultimately take a desired action.

Due to the sheer volume of websites competing for the same visitors, it’s important to ensure they stay at your website and not go to your competitor.

An average visitor will stay for about five(5) seconds on your website. If you do not provide him with what he wants, then he’ll surely leave your website. I’m sure you don’t want that to happen to you.

What you need to keep visitors on your website is by passing the five(5) second test. I suggest you use the seven(7) steps below.

1. Define your website goal.

You have to determine what you want your website to achieve. Do you want your visitors to subscribe to your newsletter? Do you want them to buy your product? Or do you want them to click your AdSense?

You’ve got to define what your main aim is and strive towards making your website center around that aim.

2. Select a tester.

Identify the typical or likely user of your site. Ask someone you know that fits that profile to act as a tester.

3. Instruct the tester.

Tell the tester that he or she will see a particular page for 5 seconds. Ask the tester to try to remember everything they see in that short period.

4. Show your web page to the tester.

Meet physically with the tester and show him your website. Remember to make sure he doesn’t see the page for more than 5 seconds.

5. Write down the findings.

Ask the test person to write down everything he or she remembers about the page.

6. Complete a report.

When the tester is done with that, ask 2 questions to assess whether he or she was able to accomplish the task defined in step 1. Give the tester the chance to answer exhaustively and maybe write down his findings.

7. Analyze the results.

Collect the findings written down in step 5 and 6 and analyze them carefully. If the tester easily recalls the main goal and knows how to do whatever he or she is supposed to do on the page, you have been successful.

If the tester has problems identifying the goal, is unclear about how to proceed, or only identified part of the features, you know you have to change something on the page.


Source by Akin Alabi

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